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Donna Dennis, NA: Review of “Ship and Dock/Nights and Days or The Gazer”

Donna Dennis, NA, an internationally exhibited artist known for her architectural installations, created “Ship and Dock/Nights and Days or The Gazer” in 2018.

With its two perched houses and a sky that changes from dawn to star-filled night, it is about time, the transformation of energy, the final journey and our collective journey into the unknown. “Have you ever wanted to walk inside a painting, sit down and experience the work from the inside?...This mixed media assemblage…takes up an entire room and carries psychological power…This is a durational work because beyond the dock the projection of sky above the horizon changes gradually from day to night to day, from painterly sky blues to dark night with brush-stroked stars as a ship changes from white against the night sky to black against the daytime skies in the distance. Thus the elements of engineering and technology that exist here in a three-dimensional space, also includes the fourth dimension of time. And, though that horizon changes, it’s always night for the viewer with the stars shining behind us.” from “Passage” by Annabel Lee, art critical, June, 2018.

PRESS RELEASE

STUDIO JOSEPH, Founded by Wendy Evans Joseph, NA, Wins 3 AIA New York State Awards!

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Honor Award—Adaptive Reuse
Larry Robbins House: Department of Management & Technology

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

This highly efficient 8,500 square-foot building is an adaptive reuse of historic infrastructure at the center of Penn’s historic campus. With emphasis on transparency and light, the design assembles places for students to gather, collaborate and interact with faculty. An elegant new glass and steel north facade provides natural light to public spaces and a seminar room. LEED Gold certification is the result of our emphasis on sustainability in all aspects of the design.

Other recent awards for this project include:
2018 Society of American Registered Architects, New York State Honor Award
2018 Society of American Registered Architects, National Design Award
2018 Chicago Atheneum, Global Architecture Design Award
2018 Architizer, International Competition, Special Recognition


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Design Citation Award
New York at Its Core

Museum of the City of New York, New York, NY

This permanent exhibition installed throughout the entire entry floor is the first-ever comprehensive telling of New York City’s history. The design integrates graphics, media and a wide range of interactive technology to create an immersive experience for all visitors.

Other recent awards for this project include:
2018 American Alliance of Museums, Exhibition of Excellence
2018 American Architecture, Chicago Atheneum, Global Architecture Awards
2017 American Institute of Architects, New York City, Honor Award
2017 Interior Design Magazine, public space, Design Award
2017 Architizer.com A+ Award for Learning and Architecture, Popular Award
2017 American Alliance of Museums, MUSE award
2017 Core 77, Design Award


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Design Citation Award
“Missing Voices” Project for Wilson Marker

Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

As President Woodrow Wilson’s policies of discrimination have come under stronger examination, Princeton sought to capture the complexity of his legacy through the design of an intervention in their central campus at Skudder Plaza. This submission to an invited competition proposes an incremental approach that integrates the voices of those unheard. 

Other recent awards for this project include:
2018  Chicago Atheneum Global Architecture Award
2018  Society of American Registered Architects, New York State Honor Award

Power 100: Artist Kerry James Marshall, NA Ranked No. 2 Most Influential Person in Contemporary Art World

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THE SECOND MOST POWERFUL person in the contemporary art world is Chicago painter Kerry James Marshall, according to Art Review magazine. The London-based publication issues an annual Power 100 list ranking the most influential figures in the contemporary art world. The list includes artists, curators, critics, collectors, and dealers, among others. Marshall is the top ranked artist on the list.

In 2017, Marshall was on the bottom half of the list at No. 68. Then he assumed the mantle of the most expensive living African American artist in May when his monumental painting “Past Times” sold for more than $21 million (including fees) at Sotheby’s New York, an artist record. Advancing all the way up to No. 2 this year, Kerry James Marshall’s ranking is the highest-ever for a black person since the Power 100 list was inaugurated in 2002.

Advancing all the way up to No. 2 this year, Kerry James Marshall’s ranking is the highest-ever for a black person since the Power 100 list was inaugurated in 2002.

Thelma Golden of the Studio Museum in Harlem was ranked No. 8 in 2017, which was the highest ranking at the time and marked the first year a black person had placed in the top 10. This year, three African Americans rank in the top 10—Marshall, Golden, and poet/critic Fred Moten, who is appearing on the list for the first time.

Golden serves as director and chief curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem where construction of a new building designed by architect David Adjaye is expected to be completed in 2021. She oversaw a recent charitable auction at Sotheby’s New York that, thanks to the largess of 42 artists who donated their works, raised more than $20 million for the building project.

Describing his regard, Art Review said: “Moten’s writing is an acknowledged influence on artists including Arthur Jafa, Glenn Ligon, Sondra Perry and Theaster Gates, with whom he shares a need to celebrate the radical traditions and rearticulate the contemporary experience of black Americans.” His trilogy, “consent not to be a single thing” was recently published.

[Fred] Moten’s writing is an acknowledged influence on artists including Arthur Jafa, Glenn Ligon, Sondra Perry and Theaster Gates, with whom he shares a need to celebrate the radical traditions and rearticulate the contemporary experience of black Americans.
Top right, Kerry James Marshall is No. 2 on the Power 100 List. | Photo by Broomberg & Chanarin; Above, Thelma Golden and Fred Moten rank in the top 10. | Photos by Julie Skarratt and Kari Orvik

Top right, Kerry James Marshall is No. 2 on the Power 100 List. | Photo by Broomberg & Chanarin; Above, Thelma Golden and Fred Moten rank in the top 10. | Photos by Julie Skarratt and Kari Orvik

ART REVIEW’S POWER 100 LIST is developed in consultation with an international panel of invited writers, artists, curators and critics. The unnamed experts consider the stature, standing and sway of candidates over the past 12 months. The barometer is “based on their international influence over the production and dissemination of art and ideas in the artworld and beyond.”

Art dealer David Zwirner tops the list occupying the No. 1 slot. With locations in New York and Hong Kong, his gallery represents Marshall and just announced the addition of Njideka Akunyili Crosby to its roster, which also includes Stan Douglas, Chris Ofili, and the estate of Roy DeCarava, among more than 75 artists.

The No. 3 spot on the list is held by the #metoo movement. Established a year ago, the phenomena appears on the list for the first time. The “viral international movement denouncing sexual harassment and the abuse of women,” is a unique selection on a list that ordinarily features individuals.

In addition to Moten, collector/philanthropist Pamela Joyner (No. 36), curator and critic Simon Njami (65), and artists Adrian Piper (49) and John Akomfrah (94), are also new entrants on the list.

Joyner is board chair at the Tate Americas Foundation and also serves on the board of the J. Paul Getty Trust. Her extensive art collection forms the traveling exhibition “Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection” which is being presented at the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame through Dec. 15.

Njami has greatly influenced the lens through which the world sees contemporary African Art. He curated the 2017 and 2018 Dak’Art biennials in Senegal and is editor-in-chief of Revue Noire, a French magazine devoted to African art.

A conceptual artist and philosopher, Piper was born in New York City. Her half-century survey exhibition is on view at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles in partnership with the Institute of Contemporary Art Los Angeles (through Jan. 6, 2019). She moved to Berlin in 2005 and refuses to return to the United States because, according to her reconstructed Facebook page, she is “listed as a ‘Suspicious Traveler’ on the U.S. Transportation Security Administration Watch List.” Piper received the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015) and Germany’s Käthe Kollwitz Prize (2018).

The Institute of Contemporary Art Boston just announced Akomfrah will present the 2019 Watershed installation. “Purple,” his immersive, six-channel installation will make its U.S. debut on May 26, 2019. On view earlier this year at the New Museum in New York, “John Akomfrah: Signs of Empire,” was the Ghanaian-born, British filmmaker’s first American survey exhibition.

Four African American artists return to the list from 2017—David Hammons (14), Theaster Gates (30), Kara Walker (50), and Arthur Jafa (87). Exploring African American identity through contemporary imagery, Jafa’s extraordinary video “Love is the Message, the Message is Death” (2016) is “a testament to [his] profound ability to mine, scrutinize, and reclaim media’s representational modes and strategies.” Compared with last year, Hammons and Walker improved their positions on the list; Gates and Jafa fell several ranks.

New entrants on the Power 100 list include Pamela Joyner, John Akomfrah, and Adrian Piper. | Photos by Linda Nylind, Jack Hems © Smoking Dogs Films, and SN/APA (EPA)/Andrea Merola

New entrants on the Power 100 list include Pamela Joyner, John Akomfrah, and Adrian Piper. | Photos by Linda Nylind, Jack Hems © Smoking Dogs Films, and SN/APA (EPA)/Andrea Merola

MARSHALL HAS CAPTIVATED the art world in recent years. On the heels of his European exhibition “Painting and other Stuff,” when “Mastry,” his 30-year career-spanning survey opened at MCA Chicago in 2016, the show was universally praised and his stature rose significantly. In public conversations and catalog essays, Marshall speaks with authority about his own practice, the work of other artists, and the history of painting.

In the wake of “Mastry,” an increasing number of paintings by Marshall began showing up at the major auction houses carrying higher and higher estimates.

Following the record established by “Past Times,” Christie’s announced “Knowledge and “Wonder” (1995), a painting by Marshall made for a Chicago public library for a fee of $10,000, was set to come to auction with an estimate of $10 million-$15 million. When the artist, and many others, questioned the decision, the city heeded the outcry and reversed itself, pulling the painting from the auction.

“History of Painting,” Marshall’s first exhibition since “Mastry,” was on view at David Zwirner in London and closed yesterday. “Through its formal acuity, Marshall’s work reveals and questions the social constructs of beauty, taste, and power,” the exhibition release said.

Through its formal acuity, Marshall’s work reveals and questions the social constructs of beauty, taste, and power.

“Engaged in an ongoing dialogue with six centuries of representational painting, Marshall has deftly reinterpreted and updated its tropes, compositions, and styles, even pulling talismans from the canvases of his forebearers and recontextualizing them within a modern setting. At the center of his prodigious oeuvre, which also includes drawings and sculpture, is the critical recognition of the conditions of invisibility so long ascribed to black bodies in the Western pictorial tradition, and the creation of what he calls a ‘counter-archive’ that reinscribes these figures within its narrative arc.” CT

VIEW Art Review’s 2018 Power 100 List

FIND MORE about Fred Moten in this recent New Yorker profile

BOOKSHELF
Recently last year by Phaidon, “Kerry James Marshall” is a fully illustrated documentation of the artist’s career and includes a conversation with fellow artist Charles Gaines. “Kerry James Marshall: Mastry,” a comprehensive, cloth-covered catalog was published to accompany the artist’s 30-year survey. An extensive interview with Marshall is featured in the exhibition catalog “Painting and Other Stuff.” “Kerry James Marshall: Look See” coincided with the artists’s first exhibition with David Zwirner gallery in London in 2014.

Shigeru Ban, NA builds temporary shelters from paper for Japan flooding victims

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Pritzker Prize-winner Shigeru Ban, NA has joined the disaster relief effort in Okayama Prefecture, Japan, personally setting up his Paper Partition System for evacuees.

The Japanese architect joined the team from the Voluntary Architects' Network (VAN) to construct a set of paper and fabric dividers inside school gymnasiums where survivors of the torrential rain are taking refuge.

The Voluntary Architects' Network erected shelters at the Second Fukuda Elementary School in Kurashiki

The Voluntary Architects' Network erected shelters at the Second Fukuda Elementary School in Kurashiki

Together with volunteers, Ban erected a modular system of partitions using recycled paper tubes, cardboard panels and fabric to create areas that can be curtained off for privacy. The materials can all be recycled again once they are no longer required.

"It is our mission as professional architects to make living environments better," Ban, who founded non-profit VAN, told local paper The Asahi Shimbun.

"We are just doing our job."

Ban's team also erected temporary privacy screens at the Hoita Elementary School

Ban's team also erected temporary privacy screens at the Hoita Elementary School

Schools across the Mabicho district have been turned into a refuge for evacuees affected by the torrential rain that swept western Japan.

Up to 30 per cent of the district was submerged under the floodwater, which claimed at least 50 lives. Over 155 people died across the region, making this the deadliest floods the country has experienced in 30 years.

VAN also installed the Paper Partition System to temporarily house nursing home residents whose centre was flooded, adapting each unit to fit wheelchairs and elderly care beds.

Specially adapted paper partitions were created at the Silver Centre Koraku

Specially adapted paper partitions were created at the Silver Centre Koraku

In 2016 Ban travelled to Ecuador to assist the rebuilding effort following a deadly earthquake, offering architectural training in the affected area. The year before he designed modular shelters for those made homeless in the wake of two devastating earthquakes in Nepal using wood, rubble and straw.

He was awarded the Pritzker Prize, one of architecture's highest honours, in 2014 in recognition of his work using low cost materials for disaster relief architecture.

After an earthquake destroyed a cathedral in Christchurch Ban built a temporary place of worship from cardboard and panels of stained glass in 2013. Seven years ago in Japan he created temporary homes in shipping containers for those displaced by an earthquake and tsunami.

Images courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network.

WEISS/MANFREDI, NA Celebrates Completion of Hunter's Point South Waterfront Park

Photo: Albert Vecerka/Esto

Photo: Albert Vecerka/Esto

Today a ribbon-cutting ceremony marked the formal opening of Phase II of Hunter's Point South Waterfront Park. A place of discovery, resilience, and extraordinary drama with its Manhattan skyline backdrop, Hunter's Point presents a new model for waterfront parks. Phase II completes the vision established in the first phase of the park, which opened in 2013. The park's extension introduces an acre of wetlands that recall the site’s pre-industrial history, and features meandering pedestrian pathways that bring the community to the waterfront. The walkways unfurl into a promenade leading to a 30-foot-high cantilevered Overlook, which offers unrivaled views of the East River and shelters the paths and wetland waterfront below.
 
The park incorporates spaces for active and passive recreation, leveraging the site’s industrial heritage to create a new resilient waterfront destination. A new island, kayak launch, promontory green, exercise terraces, and shoreline walkways extend the community’s  experience of the East River. New shoreline plantings and wetlands enhance water quality and promote wildlife and fish habitation, while protecting the community from shoreline bank erosion and rising sea levels.
 
The design of the park and open space is a collaboration between SWA/Balsley and WEISS/MANFREDI, with Arup as the prime consultant and infrastructure designer. The project was recently featured in The New York Times. For more information, visit WEISS/MANFREDI's website.

Joan Jonas, NA Wins $900,000 Kyoto Prize

Joan Jonas, NA and a friend.

Joan Jonas, NA and a friend.

The Inamori Foundation in Japan has announced that Joan Jonas has won its 2018 Kyoto Prize for Art, which comes with 100 million yen (more than $900,000) and a 20-karat gold medal. (The Kyoto Prize also goes to leaders in the technology and science worlds.) After she receives the award in November, Jonas will give a lecture to commemorate her win. She has also been invited to participate in the Kyoto Prize Symposium, which takes place next year in San Diego, California, from March 19 to 21.

Jonas is well known for her performances and video installations that focus on the relationship between viewers’ bodies and various surfaces, such as screens and mirrors. Her work has been considered central to feminist art history, and critics often regard her pieces from the 1970s as pioneering examples of early video and performance art. Jonas has steadily produced new work with a mystical, inquisitive spirit in the years since, and New Yorkers can currently see the U.S. premiere of her latest performance, Moving Off the Land, which focuses on the ocean and its role in our lives, at Danspace Project in the East Village.

A release announcing her win reads, in part, “Jonas created a new form of artistic expression in the early 1970s by integrating performance art with video. Through labyrinth-like works that lead audiences to diverse interpretations, she hands down the legacy of 1960s avant-garde art by developing it into a postmodern framework, profoundly impacting artists of later generations.”

The Kyoto Prize is one of many accolades Jonas has garnered over the past few decades. She is the winner of the Guggenheim Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the American Film Institute’s Maya Deren Award for Video, the Whitechapel Gallery’s Art Icon Award, and, most importantly, a special mention by the Venice Biennale, where she represented the United States in 2015. Tate Modern in London held a survey of Jonas’s work earlier this year.

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